Leitmotif

Reason as the Leading Motive

Let’s Kill Them All (And They Say Atheists Cannot Have Morals!)

Posted by Jerry on May 26, 2006

Following the example of the Muslim savages and the Christian idiots, the Hindu crackheads are now getting on the bandwagon of banning all free speech, killing all heretics, or in other words, protecting their religious sentiments with loyal diligence.

Here’s the latest (via Philosophy Now, Issue 55):

Let’s All Join In

A Hindu group in India is offering a reward to anyone who beheads the artist M.F. Hussain, who produces edgy reinterpretations of Hindu deities. “Those who are endangering our religion and nation should be eliminated for everyone’s good,” said Ashok Pandey, president of the Hindu Personal Law Board. “Anyone who kills Hussain… the Danish cartoonist, and those in the German company printing pictures of Ram and Krishna on tissue paper…will be given (the reward) in cash… Peace will not prevail on Earth unless such people are eliminated.” Pandey commented that Hussain was as guilty of degrading Hindu deities as the Danish cartoonists were of defiling the Prophet Muhammad. A senior advocate at the Lucknow High Court said that the comments were “just an attempt to gain cheap publicity.””

What I had discussed in previous posts regarding the unholy alliance of collectivism and religion in such regions of the world like India, the middle-east, and some countries in Africa is further corroborated by the recent incidents mentioned above.

Notice this: Japan, China, Korea and other East Asian countries are terribly collectivist societies, but where there is no ideology providing an explicit and systematic code of ethics – either political (eg. communism) or religious (Christianity), there is seldom such instances of mass violence and violations of human rights.

In other words, Japan is a collectivist society (to its core), but it lacks the cohesion of moral beliefs provided by a systematic code of ethics. Japanese people are not religious – many practice Buddhism, but in its various, lose forms. The Japanese have a variety of superstitious beliefs, but no universal system of religious or ideological moral system today. And very seldom, if ever, do we hear of human rights violations or religiously incited violence occuring in Japan, (I’m not including the pre-World War II Japan, which was very strongly monarchical/dictatorial. A dictatorial monarchy fills in the role of a Diety, its royal dictats serving as a code of ethics or value-system that creates the requisite mental cohesion among its peoples).

Now, contrast the collectivism of Japan that is unaligned with any cohesive ethical system with the collectivism of China and its communism, or of North Korea and its communism, or of Nepal and its dictatorial monarchy, or of Pakistan and its Islamic dictatorship, or of Indonesia and its Islamic predominance, or of India and its Hindutva majority (80% Indians are Hindus).

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5 Responses to “Let’s Kill Them All (And They Say Atheists Cannot Have Morals!)”

  1. Semperviva said

    JERRY WRITE BACK BUDDY

  2. Yay, religion!

    Never trust anyone with more than two arms, one spouse, or dietary restrictions. What would Jesus do?

  3. Anonymous said

    “Notice this: Japan, China, Korea and other East Asian countries are terribly collectivist societies, but where there is no ideology providing an explicit and systematic code of ethics – either political (eg. communism) or religious (Christianity), there is seldom such instances of mass violence and violations of human rights.”

    This is a fascinating thesis. I think it holds true. Take for example the world of Pagan antiquity. I would agrue that the Roman Republic was a far better culture than the Christian culture of the post Imperial period precisely because it did not offer such a corrosive ethical code.

    D Eastbrook

  4. Ergo Sum said

    Eastbrook, thank you.

    About your observation with regards to Roman pagans versus the Roman christians: I don’t know much about that era or about the pagan beliefs. However, I know this much that pagans of the time did not have a cohesive, systematic belief system that any large group of them subscribed to any time… they had many different, scattered rituals, gods, symbols, superstitions, etc. …unlike Christianity. So, I would agree with your point. It does corroborate my thesis.

  5. Anonymous said

    ” I know this much that pagans of the time did not have a cohesive, systematic belief system that any large group of them subscribed to any time… they had many different, scattered rituals, gods, symbols, superstitions, etc. …unlike Christianity.”

    This is true. It does in fact seem that wherever there is *not* a dominant and *systematic* alturist ethical code a healthier culture emerges. It would be fascinating to trace this thesis throughout history. Thanks for responding. Good luck with your new job.

    D. Eastbrook

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